Warmly illuminated cliffs, birds, and rippling water at a beach at sunset
Patrick Smith

Resources Library

Increasing Collaborative Capacity and Infrastructure for Landscape Stewardship

California Landscape Stewardship Network
August 2022
Details

Most current natural resource plans and policies focus on the need for collaborative management. Indeed, the complexity and intersectionality of today’s biodiversity, environmental justice, and climate change challenges require collaboration with diverse governmental and non-governmental partners at many scales. However, multi-benefit, cross-sector, and cross-boundary collaboration is an emerging field, one in which practices continue to evolve. While California’s leaders have expressed strong support for collaboration, agencies and legislators are seeking to identify specific roles that the state and federal government can play to activate and sustain this work at a regional scale.This paper provides an overall approach as well as specific recommendations for how state and federal agencies can support the building and sustaining of local and regional collaboration necessary to advance landscape-scale stewardship.

 

What Does Collaborative Capacity Mean? Moving Toward a Shared Understanding

Collaborating Well
August 2022
Details

Collaboratives continue to emerge as a viable and effective type of organization that can tackle today’s most complex problems. Collaboratives reflect the best qualities of formal and informal organizations — durable and adaptable. To optimize these qualities, their capacity needs must be met.  


The purpose of this research note is two-fold: 

(1)    to raise awareness that collaboratives (as a type of organization) have capacity needs just like all other enduring organizations, and
(2)    to help develop a common language and understanding of collaborative capacity and other relevant terms.

 

WSN Watershed Framework

Watershed Solutions Network
June 2022
Details

California’s long-standing efforts to integrate at a regional and/or watershed scale reflects the importance and value of aligning human activity with natural systems. Multiple state programs were (and are) designed to incentivize watershed and/or regional scale collaboration, and we have many examples of strong collaborations that cross sectors and jurisdictions. Despite the incentives and efforts, full-scale watershed collaborations across jurisdictions and sectors have remained largely elusive. This framework reflects the participants’ commitment to finding an expedient path to cross-jurisdictional, cross-sector watershed scale coordination of management scale actions that builds on and connects the promising work already in progress.

 

Equity Leader Speaker Series: Geneva EB Thompson

California Landscape Stewardship Network
June 2022
Details

On June 29, 2022, the CLSN continued its Equity Leaders Speaker Series with a visit from Geneva E.B. Thompson, Assistant Secretary for Tribal Affairs.

 

Equity Leaders Speaker Series: Geneva E.B. Thompson

California Landscape Stewardship Network
June 2022
Details

On June 29, 2022, the CLSN continued its Equity Leaders Speaker Series with a visit from Geneva E.B. Thompson, Assistant Secretary for Tribal Affairs.

 

Mycelium Map: Healing Severed Connections for Justice & Equity in Landscape Stewardship

California Landscape Stewardship Network
June 2022
Details

The Mycelium Map was first created for the Stewardship.2021 Spring Forum – a convening of the California Landscape Stewardship Network – to bring Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (JEDI) principles into all scales of participation in the Spring Forum, from the individual, organizational, network, and beyond. Going beyond that point in time, the co-creators intend for the Mycelium Map to drive conversation, lead action, and increase connectivity across our field of practice, from regional, state, national, and international levels.

 

Equity Leaders Speaker Series 2022: Katherine Toy

California Landscape Stewardship Network
May 2022
Details

On May 19, 2022, Katherine Toy, Deputy Secretary for Access at California Natural Resources Agency, joined the network for the kickoff of a multi-part series sponsored by the CLSN's Justice, Equity, Diversity & Inclusion Roundtable for Healing Severed Connections. In a conversation moderated by Kindley Lawlor and hosted by Yakuta Poonawalla, Katherine offers her perspectives on why increasing access to natural and cultural sites in California is so important.

 

Cutting Green Tape Exchange Spring 2022

California Landscape Stewardship Network
March 2022
Details

On March 17, 2022, restoration practitioners from across the state joined the 4th virtual Cutting Green Tape Exchange, hosted by the California Landscape Stewardship Network in partnership with California Natural Resources Agency. With a mix of live and pre-recorded sessions, we heard from a great cast of individuals increasing the pace and scale of beneficial environmental restoration, including:

Reflections and Progress Made on Cutting Green Tape by Wade Crowfoot, California Secretary for Natural Resources

Implementing Cutting Green Tape through CA Department of Fish & Wildlife by Jennifer Norris, Deputy Secretary for Biodiversity & Habitat

Highlighting Efficiencies in Permitting from CDFW's Cutting Green Tape Program by Brad Henderson, California Department of Fish & Wildlife 

Updates on Cutting Green Tape in the Coastal Zone by Madeline Cavalieri, California Coastal Commission 

Updates on Cutting Green Tape from SWRCB by Phil Crader, State Water Resources Control Board

Interviews on Interagency Efforts to Cut Green Tape by Amy Hutzel, California Coastal Conservancy Jim Robins, Integrated Watershed Restoration Program Kim Caringer, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency 

Interviews on Indigenous Stewardship & Cutting Green Tape by Victor Bjelacac, California State Parks  Don Hankins, CSU Chico & Indigenous Stewardship Project

The event was facilitated by Shawn Johnson, Managing Director at the University of Montana's Center for Natural Resources & Environmental Policy.

 

State of the Hill Country: 8 Key Conservation and Growth Metrics for a Region at a Crossroads

Texas Hill Country Conservation Network
February 2022
Details

This project defines and calculates eight metrics for tracking trends related to changes in the natural resources of the Texas Hill Country. Dozens of organizations — nonprofits, government agencies, academic institutions and aligned private businesses — endeavor to protect the land, water and sky of this unique region. The metrics defined here will support these entities as they work individually and collectively through the Texas Hill Country Conservation Network (the Network) to both tell the story of the need for conservation and preserve the natural resources and heritage of the Texas Hill Country.

Consistent with the priority goals outlined by the Network, these metrics focus on: Population growth in unincorporated areas • Amount of conserved lands • Amount of developed lands • Pristine streams • Per capita water consumption • Spring flow • Night sky visibility • Conservation investment

 

Creating a Nature-Positive Future: The Contribution of Protected Areas and Other Effective Area-based Conservation Measures

United Nations Development Programme
November 2021
Details

Protected areas (PAs) are essential tools for biodiversity conservation. Area-based conservation is recognized as a crucial component for achieving a nature positive future, for the resilience of the planet and biodiversity, as well as for humanity. Now, the process for developing the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework is underway, with the framework set to be adopted at the fifteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Convention, with a 2050 vision of “living in harmony with nature”.

 

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